Shockwave Therapy for Heel Pain Relief

Plantar Fasciitis and Finding Remedies for the Pain of Plantar FasciitisWhen you’re having heel pain, you’ll try anything to get rid of the pain. One technique that is rapidly gaining popularity today is shockwave therapy for heel pain.

This therapy works on the proven theory that creating micro-trauma on a cellular level causes the blood vessels and bone cells within your body to regenerate so that they heal faster. As such, it is a safe, non-invasive way to treat many chronic conditions.

What some people find funny is the paradox here that when you damage your foot, you actually heal it. The technique used here involves a series of movements that place tension on the area of your heel that’s causing the pain. Your technician then uses a shockwave hand piece transmitting shock waves to this area for four or five minutes.

These shocks feel like a small baseball bat that’s hitting your heel’s tissue causing the microbleeding and bruising that aren’t too painful and thus don’t require any anti-inflammatory drugs or icing. The bruising is actually a necessary part of the repair process that takes place over the next few months.

So, while the process is uncomfortable, it isn’t painful. Even the minimal amount of discomfort you feel diminishes as the treatment goes on. Therefore, there’s no reason you wouldn’t want to undergo the treatment again in the future. In fact, considering that you’ll experience between a 70% and 90% reduction in your pain, you’ll want to have at least three or four more treatments so that you can walk on your heels once again.

Laser Treatment for Toenail Fungus: There’s New Proof it Really Works

Laser Treatment for Toenail FungusWhen you glance down at your feet, do you see a series of yellow and white blotches on your bare toenails? Have the edges of those nails seemingly thickened over the last few weeks? Do they have rough edges and emit a funky odor, especially when you try to clip your nails? If so, it could be onychomycosis that’s the cause of it all.

It’s an unpleasant condition that has a tendency to creep up on people when they least expect it. That’s because it’s caused by a fungus that’s too small to be seen by the naked eye. So by the time it’s noticeable, damage has already been done to the nail bed and exposed nail.

Many people who find themselves in such unpleasant straits try a series of home remedies at the outset. They may cut their nails down to a painful size and slather on a wide variety of creams. Although those actions may provide some relief, they can be messy, costly and ineffective in the long run.

Good thing there are other ways to return one’s toenails back to normal. One of the most effective, affordable options is scheduling laser treatments designed to target toenail fungus. It’s FDA approved and has been used by podiatrists for years.

In April 2014, the Journal of the German Society of Dermatology published the results of a study that demonstrated the value of laser treatment for stubborn toenail fungus problems. The publication, Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, also published an article on the subject in February 2014.

They noted the value as well but also recommended that additional studies should be completed. Many are hoping that those additional studies will help narrow down treatment options and establish a list of best practices for physicians seeking to use lasers to treat fungal infections. To learn more about the treatments and how they may resolve your toenail fungus dilemma, please contact us.

Diabetic foot’ increases risk for cognitive impairment

Gangrene on the foot of a diabetic patientStudy coauthor Dr. Rachel Natovich, a Ben-Gurion University PhD graduate, and colleagues presented their findings at the American Diabetes Association’s 75th Scientific Sessions in Boston, MA, earlier this year.

One of the most severe complications of diabetes is “diabetic foot.” If not managed effectively, high blood sugar levels that occur with diabetes can cause nerve damage that results in loss of feeling in feet, meaning foot injuries such as cuts or blisters may go unnoticed. Such injuries can lead to ulcers and infections, and, in severe cases, amputation.

To read more click here.

If you are suffering from diabetic foot problems contact us today.

 

Care for the feet

FeetDr Nagabhushan, Dec 5, 2015

Diabetes miletus, commonly known as diabetes, is a metabolic disease that is caused due to rise in the blood sugar levels. It is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India, with more than 62 million individuals currently diagnosed with the disease.

The prominent symptoms of hyperglycemia (an excess of glucose in the bloodstream) are frequent urination, thirst and increased appetite. If uncared for, chronic hyperglycemia can lead to long-term damage like dysfunction and failure of different organs, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, blood vessels, and also foot problems. Diabetic patients are predisposed to foot infections.

To read more click here.

If you are suffering from diabetic foot problems contact us today.

Image courtesy of  Tiverylucky/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Your Feet Are Just As Important

FeetYour feet are probably the last part of your body that you think about until they start hurting.

They are too important to overlook. They absorb the impact of your full body weight with every step, keeping you balanced and upright. However, there are some nuisances that disturb the function of your feet – odour, cracked skin, corns, fallen arches, ingrown toenails, fungal infections and even damaged bones – which cause discomfort and reduced mobility.

While some of these problems are congenital, you can avoid many of them with a little more care.

Maintaining healthy feet is a simple regimen of daily care that will help keep the skin, bones and muscles of your feet functioning properly. Here are five foot care steps you can use everyday.

To read more click here.

If you are suffering from foot pain call us today.

Image courtesy of TiveryLucky/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Your 10 Biggest Walking Pains, Solved

We all know that walking is the safest, easiest form of exercise, so why should you bother reading up on the risks?

Because left ignored, an innocent foot pain or leg pain can become a chronic problem. Each year, nearly 250,000 walkers are hobbled as a result of a walking-induced pain or a nagging old exercise injury that walking has aggravated. As bothersome as the initial problem can be, the real damage is what happens next. You stop exercising, misplace your motivation, and soon gain weight and lose muscle tone. To make sure a debilitating walking injury doesn’t prevent you from reaching your fitness and weight loss goals, we asked leading experts for advice on how to avoid aches and treat the 10 most common walking pains.

1. Plantar fasciitis
Feels like: Tenderness on your heel or bottom of foot

What it is: The plantar fascia is the band of tissue that runs from your heel bone to the ball of your foot. When this dual-purpose shock absorber and arch support is strained, small tears develop and the tissue stiffens as a protective response, causing foot pain. “Walkers can overwork the area when pounding the pavement, especially when you wear hard shoes on concrete, because there’s very little give as the foot lands,” says Teresa Schuemann, a physical therapist in Fort Collins, CO, and a spokesperson for the American Physical Therapy Association. Inflammation can also result from any abrupt change or increase in your normal walking routine. People with high arches or who walk on the insides of their feet (known as pronating) are particularly susceptible. You know you have plantar fasciitis if you feel pain in your heel or arch first thing in the morning, because the fascia stiffens during the night. If the problem is left untreated, it can cause a buildup of calcium, which may create a painful, bony growth around the heel known as a heel spur.

What to do about it: At the first sign of stiffness in the bottom of your foot, loosen up the tissue by doing this stretch: Sit with ankle of injured foot across opposite thigh. Pull toes toward shin with hand until you feel a stretch in arch. Run your opposite hand along sole of foot; you should feel a taut band of tissue. Do 10 stretches, holding each for 10 seconds. Then stand and massage your foot by rolling it on a golf ball or full water bottle.

To reduce pain, wear supportive shoes or sandals with a contoured footbed at all times. Choose walking shoes that are not too flexible in the middle. “They should be bendable at the ball but provide stiffness and support at the arch,” says Melinda Reiner, DPM, a podiatrist in Eugene, OR and former vice president of the American Association for Women Podiatrists. Off-the-shelf orthotic inserts (by Dr. Scholl’s or Vionic, for example) or a custom-made pair can help absorb some of the impact ofwalking, especially on hard surfaces. Until you can walk pain-free, stick to flat, stable, giving paths (such as a level dirt road) and avoid pavement, sand, and uneven ground that might cause too much flexing at the arch, says Phillip Ward, DPM, a podiatrist in Pinehurst, NC. If your plantar fasciitis worsens, ask a podiatrist to prescribe a night splint to stabilize your foot in a slightly flexed position, which will counteract tightening while you sleep.

To read about the other nine solutions click here.

If you are suffering from foot pain contact us today.

Athlete’s Foot

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If you are suffering from foot pain contact us today.

Simple Steps That Help Diabetics Keep Their Feet Healthy

FeetA diabetes diagnosis can be daunting, but a simple attitude adjustment can make a world of difference in how well you fare while living with the disease. When people with diabetes take proactive steps to monitor key health indicators, experts agree that it’s possible to prevent some of the most severe risks of diabetes, including lower limb amputation.

People ages 20 and older who are living with diabetes account for about 60 percent of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report.

“The CDC says the occurrence of diabetes-related foot and lower-leg amputation has decreased by 65 percent since 1996,” says Dr. Eric Steen, DPM, a podiatrist at Pro Active Podiatry and member of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). “Working together, podiatrists and their patients with diabetes can reduce the number of amputations even more.”

To read more click here.

If you are suffering from foot pain call us today.

Image courtesy of  Tiverylucky /Freedigitalphotos.net

Don’t Let Foot Cramps and Charley Horses Slow You Down

A woman rubs her aching feet on the sofa

A woman rubs her aching feet on the sofa

You’re sound asleep, and then, without warning, you wake up with a paralyzing stiffness in your calf or foot.

Whether you call it a foot or leg cramp (aka “charley horse”), it’s a common, somewhat mysterious pain that happens when a muscle gets involuntarily stiff and can’t relax.

“They tend to happen more frequently as we age,” says sports and exercise medicine physician Kim Gladden, MD. “While they can be uncomfortable, they are rarely harmful.”

Here’s what causes these cramps, as well as tips to help prevent them.

To read more click here.

If you are suffering from foot pain please contact us today.

What Do You Want to Know About Sprains and Strains?

Foot-Ankle-PainSprains and strains are injuries to the body, often resulting from physical activity. These injuries are common and can range from minor to severe, depending on the incident. Most sprains and strains are minor and don’t require medical attention.

Sprains occur at joints and affect ligaments, which connect bone to bone. Strains affect muscles or tendons, which connect muscle to bone. They most often occur at the calf, thigh, or groin.

To read more click here.

If you are suffering from foot and ankle pain, contact us today.

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